International and local approaches to animal welfare rights


First index term 51 Peace

3. Brief Content Description: Accompaniment theory perspective, international

perspectives, (which consider the impact of protecting ecosystems and animal habitats on animal rights and welfare), and local perspectives examining the health benefits of dog parks, will be explored. 4. Division to submit this proposal:

48 - Society for the Study of Peace, Conflict and Violence: Peace Psychology Division

50 min.

6. Chair(s) of the session:

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(1) M.L. C Sicoli, PhD (Submitter)

Mailing address: 404 Darlington Drive, West Chester, PA 19382 Professional stage: Advanced-Career Professional E-mail address: mlcorbin@verizon.net Phone numbers: 6106968116 (office), 4849474630 (cell) Institution/company: Cabrini University, West Chester, PA Membership status: APA Member (2) Robin Lynn Treptow, PhD

Mailing address: 1407 Park Garden Rd., Great Falls, MT 59404 Professional stage: Advanced-Career Professional E-mail address: robinlynn1407@mac.com Phone numbers: 406-899-1548 (office) Institution/company: Independent Practice, Great Falls, MT Membership status: APA Member

7. Participants:

(1) Gay Bradshaw, PhD

Mailing address: founder/director, Kerulos Center, P.O. 1446, Jacksonville, OR 97530 Professional stage: Advanced-Career Professional E-mail address: info@kerulos.org Phone numbers: 5418991070 (office) Institution/company: Kerulos Center, Jacksonville, OR Membership status: APA Member Title of presentation: Come to Kail: Accompaniement Across Barriers of Species and Situations Electronic Archiving: Yes Coauthor 1: Tina Bloom, PhD, Western Regional OPWDD, West Seneca, NY

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(2) Lori Kogan, PhD

Mailing address: clinical sciences dept, Colordo State U, Ft. Collins, CO 80526 Professional stage: Advanced-Career Professional E-mail address: lori.kogan@colostate.edu Phone numbers: 970-491-7984 (office) Institution/company: Colorado St. U, Ft. Collins, CO Membership status: APA Member Title of presentation: Dog parks:benefits for canines and humans Electronic Archiving: Yes Coauthor 1: Regina Schoenfeld-Tacher, PhD, North CArolina State University-college of

verterinary mediciane, Raleigh, NC Coauthor 2: Madeline Richards, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Coauthor 3: Emily Kramer, Colorado State University, Fort Worth, CO

(3) Steven Handwerker, PhD

Mailing address: International Association for the Advancement of Human Welfare, 103 South

Beach Rd., Burlington, VT 05403 Professional stage: Advanced-Career Professional E-mail address: peacewk@peacewk.org Phone numbers: 561-371-0412 (office) Institution/company: Intn'l Assoc for Advancement of Human Welfare, Burlington, VT Membership status: APA Member Title of presentation: Proactively protecting animal rights locally and globally Electronic Archiving: Yes Coauthor :

8. Discussant(s):

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(1) Robin Lynn Treptow, PhD

Mailing address: 1407 PArk Garden Rd., Great Falls, MT 59404 Professional stage: Advanced-Career Professional E-mail address: robinlynn1407@mac.com Phone numbers: 406-899-1548 (office) Institution/company: Independent Practice, Great Falls, MT Membership status: APA Member

9. Accommodation request: None 10. Submit for CE: False

Received: 10/29/2018 11:52:47 PM

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Accompaniment theory, and international and local approaches to animal welfare/rights

Animal welfare/rights can be seen as an evolving area of scientific interest and international concern. Psychology seeks to understand animals for their own sakes-independent of their utility to other species. Accompaniment theory, an interdisciplinary system of thought that shifts focus from the individual to relationship, is now being used in physics, math and psychology. Bradshaw and Bloom, working with diverse animal species and human prisoners, show how accompaniment theory and practice can heal conflict and revitalize peace. Handwerker looks at how the degradation of the environment around the world harms animals and leads to more conflict.He explores the areas of ecosystem, ecocentrism and eco-psychology. Kogan approaches animal welfare from the more micro aspect of establishing positive benefits for both dogs and humans at dog parks at the local level. An international consensus is emerging that animals need us to understand their experiences, respect their rights and protect them from harm.

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(1) Come to Kail: Accompaniement Across Barriers of Species and Situations

Psychologist Mary Watkins writes, “Accompaniment begins with stopping and noticing, crossing over the invisible lines that separate us, making time to connect and to respond.” We discuss psychosocial accompaniment as a core understanding and practice of the ongoing paradigm shift from individualism to relationship. Accompaniment is resonant with similar movements across all disciplines (quantum mechanics in physics, complexity theory in mathematics, attachment theory in psychology). Drawing from work with different species and human prisoners, we illustrate how the embodiment and engagement of accompaniment provide a powerful, healing medium for dissipating conflict and revitalizing peace. (2) Dog parks:benefits for canines and humans

Parks have received increased attention and resources over the past few years from cities big and small. In 2017, over seven billion dollars was spent on parks in the 100 largest U.S. cities and 751

of those parks were off-leash dog parks (2017 City Park Facts, 2017). Dog parks have led the way in park development with growth in spending, interest, and research. From 2010-2015, the number of dog parks in the U.S. grew by 20% with several cities now having as many as 5 dog parks per 100,00 residents (“Dog Parks Lead Growth,” 2015). Previous research on dog parks has studied aspects such as public health, park design, and human and canine interactions, with results suggesting numerous benefits (Rahim, Romero Barrios, McKee, McLaws, & Kosatsky, 2018). This qualitative study was designed to assess the one health benefits (e.g., the effect on humans, dogs, and the community) of dog parks. Structured interviews were conducted at four dog parks in Colorado. These interviews were transcribed and coded to identify core themes. Preliminary results suggest that people enjoy many benefits of dog parks and view them as important parts of their community. Examples of benefits include canine exercise and social opportunities, as well as human social interactions and a sense of community/belonging. In summary, this study suggests that there are several compelling reasons for communities and individuals to invest attention and resources in dog parks.

(3) Proactively protecting animal rights locally and globally

The human condition involving overpopulation, resource depletion, misuse, waste and moral deterioration has been increasingly devastating for all species, environments and habitats. Thousands of animal and marine species are endangered and/or extinct. Thousands!! The presenter will share his 40 years experience as a licensed psychologist in promoting the preservation and protection of species and environments. This includes his one on one interface with NGOs, international not for profits and decades of public advocacy within the political arenas. The presenter will explicate the impact of how protecting ecosystems and habitats on behalf of animal rights, and endangered species influence the well being of all human and animal species. In so doing the meanings of ecosystem, ecocentrism and eco-psychology in relation to what human inputs are needed and the micro and macrocosmic dimensional aspects of those inputs will be explored. The issues of coping, adapting and transformational processes as part of building psychological and environmental resiliency will be explored as well.

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